Frequently Asked Questions:

Q - Why is the Employer's Report of Occupational Injury or Illness form so important?

A - The Employer's Report is required by the state. It begins the Workers' Compensation claim process, which provides the employee's medical coverage as well as temporary or permanent disability benefit payments. Remember, it is your responsibility as a Supervisor to complete and give or send the Employee's Claim for Workers' Compensation Benefits form, DWC-1, to the injured employee within one working day of your knowledge of the injury. Completing the form is not an admission of liability.

Q - Why is the Employee's Claim for Workers' Compensation Benefits form necessary?

A - The Employee's Claim form is required by law for any occupational injury occurring on or after January 1, 1990. The form must be provided to the injured employee within one working day of injury notification. The returned (completed) form guarantees the employee certain legal rights in the Workers' Compensation process and provides for the release of medical records to assist eligibility determination.

Q - Who determines what benefits an employee is eligible for and whether or not the injury is work-related?

A - The type and amount of benefits are established by law. The County of Riverside, Human Resources Department, Workers' Compensation Division, determines whether the injury is work-related or not, after reviewing all the facts of the claim, reviewing medical reports, and sometimes required medical evaluations.

Q - What is a delay in decision?

A - A Delay in Decision is a notice sent by the Workers' Compensation Division to an injured worker when there is a question related to the compensability of the injury.

Q - What if an employee tells me an injury is job-related but does not wish to file a claim for the injury?

A - Have the employee fill out the Medical Service Order [WC-5]. This form documents the employee's declination of the County's offer of treatment. Declining treatment means the employee is not seeking treatment from any source. If the employee is going to go to his/her own personal physician or health group, this is NOT declining treatment; it is self-procured treatment. If the employee is seeking self-procured treatment, call the Workers' Compensation Division immediately for instructions.